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Yoga Protocol for Cancer Patients: A Systematic Exploration of Psychophysiological Benefits

Author(s):

Mara Mirandola*, Miguel David Sabogal Rueda, Federica Andreis, Fausto Meriggi, Claudio Codignola, Elena Gadaldi, Tiziana Prochilo, Michela Libertini, Brunella Di Biasi, Chiara Abeni, Silvia Noventa, Luigina Rota, Chiara Ogliosi and Alberto Zaniboni   Pages 1 - 8 ( 8 )

Abstract:


Background: Several studies report that practising Yoga may lead to numerous psychophysiological benefits in patients in treatment for cancer. Moreover, it may result in an effective alternative for coping with sleep disturbances, anxiety, depression and fatigue symptoms. A study it was designed to explore the benefits that yoga could lead to, and therefore corroborating Yoga as a therapeutic activity that can have a beneficial impact on patients diagnosed with cancer.

Methods: 70 patients were recruited, of which 20% were males and 80% were females, of 18 years of age and older. All the patients were being treated at the oncology department for gastrointestinal, mammary or genital carcinoma and the disease was metastatic in 80% of patients. Data were collected between April 2013 and May 2017. The protocol consisted in a 90- minutes weekly yoga lesson for 8 consecutive weeks, and the data collection was carried out in 2 phases: (T0) pre-protocol assessment and (T1) post-protocol assessment. Psychophysiological assessment was carried out with the following scales: (BFI) Brief Fatigue Inventory; (HADS) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale e (PSQI) Pittsburgh Sleep Quality.

Results: Data analysis showed a significant difference between (T0) and (T1) HADS (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) scores. The constructs such scale consists in are relative to psychological variables for the assessment of anxiety and depression. Differently, scores from (BFI) Brief Fatigue Inventory and (PSQI) Pittsburgh Sleep Quality didn’t show significant differences between (T0) and (T1): such scales are relative to psychophysiological variables for the assessment of perception of fatigue and quality of sleep.

Conclusions: It’s noteworthy that data, once analysed, showed a significant difference between pre-protocol and post protocol levels of anxiety and depression, but not for the perception of fatigue nor the quality of sleep. In accordance with the scientific literature, data from this study allow to highlight that practicing Yoga may promote change in levels of perceived anxiety and depression in patients in treatment for cancer, positively affecting their (QoL).

Keywords:

Yoga Protocol, cancer, depression, anxiety, fatigue, sleep quality

Affiliation:

Poliambulanza Foundation, Psychologist, Poliambulanza Foundation, Clinical Psychologist, Poliambulanza Foundation, Psycho-Oncologist, Poliambulanza Foundation, Medical Oncologist, Poliambulanza Foundation, General Surgeon, Poliambulanza Foundation, Psychologist, Poliambulanza Foundation, Medical Oncologist, Poliambulanza Foundation, Medical Oncologist, Poliambulanza Foundation, Medical Oncologist, Poliambulanza Foundation, Medical Oncologist, Poliambulanza Foundation, Medical Oncologist, Poliambulanza Foundation, Medical Oncologist, Poliambulanza Foundation, Medical Oncologist, Poliambulanza Foundation, Medical Oncologist



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